Skip to main content

To Quilt: Part Deux

Yesterday I took the chance to work on the second step of making a quilt. The mathematics.

Ugh.

Okay, so bear with me while I try to explain this.... math is not my strong point so explaining it might be a little harder.

First I took my basic layout and used it as a guide for what I wanted. Since I made this somewhat to scale (ie 8x10 when my quilt will be around 80x100) I knew that in the end what I was going to want was a quilt 5 blocks long by 4 blocks wide.

So.... if I know my quilt is 105 inches long and that I need 5 squares I can then divide that and come out with 21. I did the same with the width (81/4) and since that didn't come out even I just rounded up. Making my squares 21 x 21 inches.

Following me? We're still in the elementary education system here.

Then I had to make my master pattern.

Master Plan- Notice how it's color coded?
This helped me keep track of what sections would be sewn together.

 This was accomplished with a lot of aspirin and some help from my math loving roommate.

I had to divide my square into five increasingly smaller squares that were sectioned off like I described in Part One. Essentially what I needed to know was how large each strip of fabric needed to be (21in/5sections=4.2in/2halves of each section=2.1in on each side of my square).  Each was about 2 inches wide and increased in length by roughly 4 inches per strip--the longest one being 21 x 2; the smallest, center piece being 4x4.

That part is the high school math.

This took about an hour... maybe more but once I was done I could then create my pattern pieces.

Pattern Pieces
To make my pattern pieces I added a seam allowance of 1/4 inch to each side. So I had to add 1/2 inch to the length and the width of my strips. Then I cut them out and marked each piece with the information I needed to remember.

Whew! Are you still with me? I'm not sure I am.

Okay, once I had this done I could start considering how much fabric I needed. When you buy fabric it generally comes by the yard in widths of either 45 inches or 60 inches (I've only ever once bought 60 inch fabric... it's ALOT of fabric). Now that I knew how big my strips were and how many I was going to need--forty strips of 21x2 being the largest-- I could start estimating how much fabric I would need.

I usually am terrible at this part and tend to overcompensate and buy WAY too much.

My sewing friendly other roommate and I decided on a yard of each fabric, which would be 3 ft x 45 inches of each color. Note: This is just for the top of the blanket, not the bottom.

I took Vicbowin down to Hobby Lobby and she picked out these fabrics.

I've Got Suuuuunshine!
The Mischievite then broke an $8 fairy figurine and I hustled everyone home where I threw my bag on my desk and dropped into an exhausted heap on my bed--never to be seen or heard from again.

And that's the hardest part of making a quilt.

Any questions?

Comments

Salma said…
Wow, that's something. I have absolutely no talents. Beautiful family btw.


I'm your newest follower from the Chickadee hop. http://ohmommymoon.blogspot.com
Mika said…
Wow. You are very talented!
I'm following from the blog hop.
I'd love a follow back at www.mikaspantry.blogspot.com
Thanks!
Mika
TexaGermaNadian said…
You are waaay more talented (and patient) than I could ever be. Can't wait to see how it turns out!! Hopped over from the Totally Tuesday Blog hop. Have a great one!
http://texagermanadian.blogspot.com/

Popular posts from this blog

Altered Shoe Art: Ring Holder Shoe Tutorial

This was my week two craft for So You Think You're Crafty. I placed third that week for this one. I thought you might enjoy finding out how I made it.


I tried about a million different decorations before settling on one that didn't drown out my rings. I wanted them to the focal point. This is also why I went with black fabric and not something more vivid.

Don't be intimidated by the lack of 101 I'm giving you. It really is a straight forward sort of project. If you know how to use a glue gun without burning yourself you can do this. Just be sure to dust off your imaginative brain space first. :)

The one important thing you might be wondering is how I got the pink fabric to stick to the shoe. I really just Mod Podged it on.

There are several different ways to make ring tubes that you can find online. One I saw used that colored foam paper stuff that you find in the kids craft section. I thought that might have been easier, but I had scraps of batting lying around so I …

How-To Pretend You Work For Anthropologie

The problem with Anthropologie is that they cost way too much money. WAY TOO MUCH! I mean, come on--these book boxes:

Cost $68-$188!

Do you have that kind of money?

I don't, but you know what I do have? I have a library with a cart full of free books that no one really cares about! So guess what I did... I made my own (and then I gave them away because I really don't have anywhere to put them).

Here's how.
















What do you think?

Car-Seat Cover Tutorial

Choose your fabric. It's fine to buy something a little cheaper for the back, since no one is going to see it. In fact I got both of these fabric pieces in the clearance section at Wal-Mart. You will also need, matching thread, batting for the middle, and binding for the edges. And alot of pins.


Take your old car seat cover and lay it flat on the paper you've chosen to use. You will have several sections you need to trace: A top, a bottom, and any sides or overhanging areas.


Now draw around the first section of the layed out car seat.. Generally speaking you can assume that the binding is hiding your seam so you don't need to make an allowance for it, but be aware that the issue might arise.


Be sure to mark any parts that lie on the inside of the pattern, like strap holes and any extra stitching.


Your patterns will start looking something like this.


When you cut out your pattern sections, remember to write what each line is for, and cut any holes so you can m…